Trailblaze & Grow Tag: adujsting plan

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Don’t #BeSomebody

An integrated approach is essential to every marketing strategy.  As the internet of things has grown, a marketer must consider how offline activities will affect online activities, and vice versa.  With marketing undergoing rapid and massive changes, it is inevitable that there will be the occasional high-profile slip-up.

One of the biggest risks that any campaign faces, particularly when targeting younger demographics, is the risk of coming across as tone-deaf or otherwise hypocritical. This is exactly what happened when an experienced and highly successful marketing professional, Kash Shaikh, launched his much-maligned “inspiration” company, #BeSomebody (yes, it’s a hashtag and the company name).

The idea behind #BeSomebody was fairly simple. Connect aspiring hobbyists or professionals in everything from piano playing to scuba diving with actual experts who can teach them how to be successful in those fields. In order to market their company, #BeSomebody had the fairly unique idea of conducting inspirational assemblies at high schools throughout Texas and (eventually) the rest of the United States.

Unfortunately for Kash Shaikh and #BeSomebody, their message fell on unbelieving ears when they conducted an assembly at Austin High. Instead of finding the assembly inspirational, the students felt like Mr. Shaikh was using his particularly privileged experience (in the form of an impressive resume, extensive travel, and ability to live with his parents well into his adulthood) to connect with high school students, many of whom had little to none of the privileges that Mr. Shaikh had available to him.

Ultimately, the students at Austin High launched a robust campaign of mockery, in which the hashtag #Lookadouche was used to disseminate parody videos and other derisive material.

What we can learn from #BeSomebody

While #BeSomebody ultimately had a fairly bad reaction to their marketing strategy, there is still a great deal that we can learn not only from what #BeSomebody did wrong, but what they did right as well.

What #BeSomebody did wrong

Clearly, #BeSomebody made mistakes in the execution of their marketing plan. Perhaps the most egregious mistake they made was failing to test properly their message before going out to schools such as Austin High. If they had tested their message in a smaller, more focused setting, they probably would have found that their message came across as out of touch and hypocritical, and could have adjusted it (or scrapped it altogether).

The other misstep that #BeSomebody made was their reaction after the mocking campaign from the students at Austin High. Instead of taking the message in stride, Kash Shaikh acted fairly petulant, mocking everything from grammatical mistakes to the overall reaction of the students, including claims that the students simply lacked the proper passion and motivation. Clearly, this was not the right approach to take, which was proven by the fact that Mr. Shaikh later went on to apologize and thank Austin High for their “tough love”.

#BeSomebody could have even turned this situation around.  The company could have accepted the criticism and positively engaged in the conversation.  In 2005, a journalist created a blog called Dell Hell that chronicled the horrible customer service that he experienced.  Dell Hell caught fire, and many unhappy customers jumped on board.  However, Dell turned lemons into lemonade.  A couple of takeaways from the event include:

  • Real conversations are two-way.
  • Think before you talk—but always be yourself.
  • Don’t be afraid to apologize.

These were a lesson the Dell learned in 2007, and it is just as powerful today.

What #BeSomebody did right

Despite the outcome, there is still a lot that can be learned about what #BeSomebody did well. For starters, they used a very creative marketing tool – high school assemblies – to reach their target market. If their message had gone over well, this would have proven to be an incredibly cost-effective way to build an audience for their app and their company. Additionally, #BeSomebody was able to execute a plan using a very small team and utilizing very little overhead.

At the end of the day, #BeSomebody is a lesson in testing one’s message and ensuring that the message actually resonates with the target audience. While they did make mistakes, #BeSomebody has a great team of creative and marketing experts. Whether or not #BeSomebody ultimately turns out to be a successful company, the team will find success one way or another. That being said, we should all look closely at what they did wrong and right, so we can avoid, or replicate, where appropriate.

Sources:

http://customerthink.com/you_can_learn_dell_hell_dell_did/
http://www.texasmonthly.com/daily-post/austin-tech-bros-besomebody-are-losing-fight-they-picked-against-local-high-school
http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-trending-31754918

Plan A or Plan B

Why Marketing Plans Fail and How to Avoid it

Even with a solid strategy and careful planning, marketing plans can sometimes fail. A plan may fail to achieve business goals or it may stall out at one stage or another. Either way a marketing team will face some hard questions. These four tips can help your team avoid (or adapt to) an under-performing program.

1. Avoid Over-Reaching

The development of a truly competitive strategy requires an understanding of your customer and competition. Identifying your target market is be a challenge of every marketing strategy. Specifically identifying this group not just by demographics but also considering behavioral and psychographic segmentation provides a highly defined starting point for effective strategizing.
Learn from your competition to avoid costly and time-consuming missteps. Understand how they are positioned and if they have recently pivoted to a new market. Try their offering and identify how your company can effectively compete for you target market’s affections and loyalty. Use this information to keep your team laser focused on what is important.

2. Prioritize and Document

Use your target market and competitive intelligence to help prioritize tactics based on the resources at your disposal. Only then can a targeted plan with appropriate KPIs and an accurate goal-oriented timeline be developed. You will be pivoting and adjusting the plan as you start measuring your performance. To maintain your focus, don’t forget to document everything outlined. Update your strategy documents as you learn more about your customer, the competition and your company’s distinctive talent capital. These documents will keep you grounded and remind you of why certain strategic decisions, as the team changes or the competition heats up.

3. Don’t Forget to Operationalize

Your team should spend as much time planning for the implementation of your strategy as they have developing it. Experience really makes a difference to ensure that the strategies your company develops are being executed in the most effective way. Ensure that each team addresses the following before implementation:

  • Pairs strategies with appropriate tactics
  • Clarify accountability, responsibilities and communication between marketing, sales and operations
  • Recontextualize metrics into useful, relevant information sets. (Think dashboards and reporting.)

Since it is difficult to identify each and every way that marketing plans may fail, you should also develop ways to respond to setbacks before they occur.

4. Measure and Communicate

Begin by clearly defining accountability and responsibilities as well as the reporting cadence for your team. Create a forum for accountable parties to review performance and share information with leadership and other teams. Sharing wins (and challenges) will help solicit ideas, motivate the company and operationalize accountability and flexibility.
Even though we all aim for success, knowing how to learn from failure can make your company stronger. The way that marketers choose to address setbacks, failures, and other fizzles can make the difference between a learning experience and a wasted opportunity.